Transition in Your DC Fall Wardrobe with the Help of Custom Closet Design

Closet America's Custom Walk-ins Make Seasonal Wardrobe Shifts Easy

This has been an unusual fall, for sure, with temperatures in the 80-degree range even into mid-October for most of the DC area. I’m definitely not complaining, but now that we’re finally starting to see a drop in temperature, it’s the perfect time to make the switch to a fall/winter wardrobe.

This is a time of year that people like me (i.e., people with too many clothes) tend to dread. There are so many storage totes and clothes hangers to shuffle around. But with a few tips and the right closet design, switching your seasonal wardrobe can be relatively painless.

Include a Wardrobe Lift in Your Walk-in

Switching out items on your closet’s upper hanging rods tends to be the worst part of a seasonal wardrobe transition, but if you’re using a wardrobe lift, it can actually be pretty quick. You get an easy-to-grab handle that helps stabilize the rod once it’s pulled down, and loading and unloading only takes a minute or two (and you don’t have to use a step stool). I especially recommend wardrobe lifts for people who might be a little on the short side but still want to take full advantage of upper wall space.

Your Shelves Can Be Moved

People often forget about this, but if you’re using a Closet America system, you more than likely have adjustable shelves. These can be moved up or down to accommodate a changing wardrobe. Fall clothing is generally a little bulky, especially items like sweatshirts and chunky sweaters. Adjustable shelving allows you to still fit everything once it’s folded.

Move Those Heavy Pieces Out

Do you normally store very bulky items, like heavy winter coats or furs, in your bedroom walk-in? These take up a lot of room and tend to make your closet less visually appealing by swallowing up everything they’re stored next to. Consider moving these pieces to other closets (the front hall, the mudroom, or even just a spare guest closet) so that your walk-in is easier to navigate.

If you have no choice and must keep these coats in your main closet, that’s totally fine. Just make sure you store them on a lower hanging rod rather than up high. Closets tend to feel more cluttered when heavier pieces are toward the top. And if you just want to keep a go-to coat for daily wear in your closet, consider adding a valet rod.

Get Creative with Boot Storage

Things like thin tank tops and short-sleeved casual tees probably won’t get much use in the fall. If you normally fold these items and keep them in drawers, think about repurposing the drawers for your boots now that cool weather has arrived. Deep drawers can often accommodate 2–3 pairs of tall boots, assuming that you lay one boot on top of the other in opposite directions. By placing them in drawers, you’ll get them off the floor and still be able to easily see your options.

Invest in a Rolling Rack

Chances are, you’re probably storing your off-season clothing in an entirely separate area of your home. And while I’m all for healthy living, you probably don’t want your wardrobe transition to feel like a marathon. A rolling rack can be your best friend in this situation, allowing you to transfer all your clothing onto it so that you can roll it straight to the renovated guest closet (or any other spot) that you’re using for storage.

If you have a slightly roomier home in an area like Kent or Logan Circle and need to move clothes to a location on a different floor, it might be worth your time to purchase a second rack. They typically fold down for easy storage and won’t take up much room.

I know it’s a lot of work, but as you’re making the switch, think about how much easier it will be to browse through your slimmed-down closet. If you’re lucky, you’ll only have to make the transition a few times a year, and with a custom closet, the process will hopefully go so smoothly that you’ll already be excited for spring cherry blossoms. We’d love to set up a free consultation to get you started.

 

 

Lead image credit: Flickr user Anthony Quintano (CC BY 2.0)